Is This A Poison?

Search our list of some of the most common poisons in your home and learn what to do if someone gets into them. Click the first letter of the poison you are looking for, or type the name in the search field below.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Air Fresheners

Air fresheners are used to eliminate odors and to emit pleasant fragrance. They come in sprays, candles, oils, gels, soft beads and plug-ins. This information does not include scented lamp oils or concentrated essential oils. Contact the poison center now if your child has come in contact with one of these products.

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Ammonia

Household ammonia is used as a cleaner on its own, or as an ingredient in window cleaners and floor waxes. Ammonia is also the ingredient in smelling salts because the sharp, pungent odor irritates the lining of the nose and lungs which triggers the inhalation reflex (breathing in).

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Antacids

Antacids are an over the counter medication which come in liquid, effervescent tablet, chewable gummie and tablet form. They are used to treat acid reflux, heartburn and indigestion by neutralizing stomach acid.

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Antibiotic Ointment

Most antibiotic ointments available over-the-counter are a petrolatum base and contain three antibiotics: bacitracin, neomycin and polymyxin B. It is used to help prevent infection for cuts, scrapes, burns and other minor injuries.

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Antibiotics

Most families with children are careful to keep medications out of the reach of their little ones. But what happens when an antibiotic that requires refrigeration is prescribed? Parents may not even think about “up, away and out of sight” when it comes to the refrigerator.

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Baby Lotion, Oil or Powder

Baby lotions, oils, and powders are a staple in the nursery. Children are often found smearing them all over themselves and everything else nearby!

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Baby Wipes

If you have a baby or young children in your home, you know that they may put anything in their mouth. Baby wipes are a staple in the homes of parents with young children. These products are only minimally toxic, but they can be a choking hazard if swallowed.

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Baking Soda

Baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) has a wide range of uses both in the home and medical settings.

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Bath Bombs

Bath bombs are available in a variety of shapes, colors, and fragrances and are added to the bathtub to soften the skin and make a more relaxing experience. They are usually made of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) mixed with a weak acid and various fragrances, oils, dyes, or moisturizers.

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Bath Water

Babies and toddlers love to play during bath time. At some point all children will ingest bath water by sucking on a wet washcloth or drinking from a bath tub toy or cup.

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Birth Control Pills

Birth control pills (also called oral contraceptives) are low doses of hormones taken to prevent pregnancy.  Most birth control pills come in a dose-pack with 28 pills.  The pills may have 2 or 3 different colors to show they have different ingredients.   Children’s bodies are not ready to respond to hormones, so nothing will happen.

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Bleach

Typical household bleach products are 4-8% sodium hypochlorite, with the remaining 92-96% being water. Bleach is an irritant to the skin, the mucous membranes, and the gastrointestinal tract.

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Bubbles

Sometimes when kids are playing with bubbles, they suck them into their mouth instead of blowing them out or they put the wand in their mouth, thinking it is a lollipop. Other times, children tip the bottle into their mouth and take a sip. Once a child tastes the bubbles, they often make a yucky face and spit them out.

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Caffeine

Caffeine is found in a variety of beverages, foods, and medications. Many adults drink coffee, tea, or soft drinks to start their day and increase mental alertness.

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Calamine Lotion

Calamine is an over-the-counter lotion that is used to treat a variety of skin conditions such as poison ivy rash, sunburn, and eczema. It provides relief from the pain, itching and swelling caused by insect bites and stings, it helps dry the ooze from poison ivy rash, and it can provide relief from the burning sensation due to heat rash and sun burn.

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Candles

Most candles are made of beeswax, paraffin wax or a plant based wax. Additional ingredients include dyes to color the candle and essential oils to add fragrance. Commonly children have easy access to birthday candles and take a bite from the small candle.

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Chalk

Both sidewalk and blackboard chalk are made from calcium carbonate or calcium sulfate. Chalk is considered non-toxic in small amounts.

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ChapStick

Ingredients may vary, but the products typically contain a combination of skin softeners, such as petrolatum, bees wax, lanolin, mineral oil, vitamin E, and aloe. Some chapsticks include a sunscreen while others may be medicated with camphor or salicylic acid to treat sore lips.

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Charcoal Briquettes

Charcoal briquettes are made up of the finely broken up pieces of coal and a variety of additives are mixed in to act as binder which holds the charcoal briquette together. Examples of these additives include wood charcoal, limestone, starch and sawdust.

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Chewing Gum

Old tales tell us chewing gum is not digested and stays in the stomach for up to seven years, but the truth is swallowing chewing gum is not harmful. It is true that the body does not digest or break down gum, however the gum does not stay in the stomach, and it doesn’t stick inside you like a piece of gum to the bottom of a desk

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Compact Fluorescent Lightbulb

Fluorescent light bulbs contain a very small amount (4 to 6 mg) of mercury inside a glass tubing. In contrast, a thermometer contains about 500 mg of mercury. No mercury is released into the environment when the bulb is in use, it is only released when the glass tubing is cracked or broken.

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Cosmetics

Cosmetics, also known as make-up, are a wide range of products applied to the body, most often the face, to enhance appearance. They are often kept in areas that are easy for children to reach such as purses, drawers, and bathroom cabinets. In an attempt to imitate what they see, sometimes the child will smear the make-up all over their face causing it to get into the eyes or mouth. Children will also taste test or bite into the product.

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Crayons

If you are looking for the answer to “what do I do if my child ate a crayon?” … you’ve come to the right place! Crayons are made of a paraffin wax which has been heated and then cooled.

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Cut Flower Food

If you’ve bought or received flowers, you’ve likely come across Floralife®, a product that is meant to keep cut flowers fresh. This small package of white powder is certified non-toxic, but it is still not intended for ingestion. 

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Denture Cleansers

Denture cleansers are intended to clean and disinfect dentures outside of the mouth. The cleansers eliminate stains caused by foods and beverages, remove debris from between the teeth, and help stop the growth of harmful microorganisms on the denture surface.

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Denture Cream (Adhesive)

The main ingredient in most denture creams available today are adhesive-based substances such as polymethyl vinyl (PVM), and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Small pea sized amounts of the denture cream are placed on the fitting surface of the dentures.

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Deodorant/Antiperspirant

Deodorants/Antiperspirants are used on the skin to reduce perspiration and control body odor. They are sold as creams, roll-on, aerosol spray, and solid forms. Most deodorants/antiperspirants contain a form of aluminum combined with a fragrance or essential oil.

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Diaper Rash Products

Diaper rash products are usually ointments or creams that come in tubes or jars. They can be bought at the grocery store or drug store without a prescription. They are used to protect the child’s skin from urine and feces that can cause a red, painful rash. Most diaper rash products contain zinc oxide and are white in color.

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Diatomaceous Earth

Diatomaceous earth (DE) is a powder made from the sediment of fossilized algae and is very high in silica. It has been used since ancient times as a building material. Today, it is most often used as an insecticide that works by drying out the insect. There are also food-grade sources that have become “trendy” dietary supplements, but evidence for this use is lacking.

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Dishwashing Detergent

Dishwashing detergent can come in vibrant colors or candy-like pods or tablets. This makes it particularly tempting for young children, who may be attracted to detergent and get it in their mouths.

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Disinfectant Wipes

There are many different brands of disinfectant wipes available for household use, such as Lysol® or Clorox® Disinfecting Wipes. The ingredients vary from brand to brand, but their purpose is to disinfect hard surfaces such as countertops, floors, bathroom fixtures, key boards, and phones.

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Disposable Diapers

Diapers often contain a layering of fluff material for comfort, Super Absorbent Polymer (SAP) to soak up liquid, and a waterproof outer shell. Some diapers also include a fragrance.

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Dryer Sheets

While some laundry products can be a hazard to young children, dryer sheets aren’t typically one of them. Dryer sheets are squares of wispy disposable fabric like polyester that contain fabric softeners and chemicals, which give them a pleasant fragrance, but the amount of these chemicals is low. 

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Easter Egg Dye Tablets

A frequent call at Easter time involves a child eating the egg dye. Sometimes children take a drink of the dye diluted in water and vinegar or taste a tablet thinking it is candy. Swallowing a sip of dye liquid or a tablet or two can cause an upset stomach.

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Epsom Salt

Epsom salt is a chemical compound that is often used for detox baths or foot soaks. The substance may look like table salt, but it’s quite different.

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Essential Oils

Many parents call the poison center asking, “my child swallowed an essential oil, what do I do?” Essential oils are derived from plant-based sources and are available in many formulations such as a single ingredient or blends of multiple oils.

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Exfoliating Scrub

Skin exfoliants remove dead skin cells to improve the overall health and appearance of the skin. They can also enhance the effect of skin care products by increasing absorption across the skin.

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Face Masks

Today, you can buy cosmetic face masks that promise to moisturize your skin or clear blemishes. While ingredients vary based on the kind or brand, they usually contain a combination of creams, fragrances, and cleansers.

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Face Toner

Face toners are used to remove dirt, oil, or cosmetics from the skin and prevent acne development. They may contain a variety of ingredients such as witch hazel, salicylic acid, or benzyl alcohol to exfoliate and treat the skin.

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Feces

“My child ate poop!” is a common call for the Missouri Poison Center. At some point, most toddlers eat their own or someone else’s feces (poop), and having pets in the home increases the chances.

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Fertilizer

Fertilizers can be organic or inorganic material that is added to soil to supply nutrients to the plant which are essential for their growth. They come in both granular and liquid forms. In general, fertilizers are considered to be of low toxicity, they can be mildly irritating to the skin, mouth and stomach.

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Fireworks

Fireworks are available in many different forms, and are used to entertain crowds with their noise, smoke, colors, and light. Fireworks typically come in a thick paper or cardboard tube, with the flammable powder inside the tubes.

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Food Poisoning

Most cases of food poisoning are self-limited (will resolve without treatment). Anyone who eats contaminated food is at risk for symptoms but it is especially concerning for infants and small children, the elderly, and those with chronic health conditions or weakened immune systems.

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Foreign Bodies

Foreign bodies that are soft, small, pliable, and non-sharp such as, pieces of foam, paper or fabric, marbles, soft plastic toys, and buttons usually will pass uneventfully through the GI tract after being swallowed.

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Fruit Pits

Fresh cherries, peaches, and other stone fruits are delicious, as long as you stay away from the pit!

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Furniture Polish Spray

Has your child swallowed furniture spray polish like Pledge®? Well, you’ve come to the right place! Aerosol furniture spray contains a variety of solvents, oils, and waxes that are used to polish wood and restore its natural shine.

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Gas Drops

Over-the-counter gas drops usually contain simethicone, which treats the discomfort associated with excess gas. It helps relieve the painful pressure by breaking up gas bubbles in the stomach and intestines.

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Gel Freezer Packs

Freezer gel packs are a great way to keep school lunches cool, and they also ease swelling or soothe a cut. Some are designed for kids and come in cute shapes and bright colors, so it’s no wonder that kids are curious about these squishy gel packs.

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Glass Cleaner

Some cleaning products are blue or green and can resemble sports drinks. For this reason, they may be attractive to curious children, so it is important to keep them locked up and out of reach.

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Glitter

Kids love glitter. It’s colorful, it’s sparkly, and it makes any event a little more fun. But what is it made of? And what might happen if your child decides to taste it? The good news is that glitter is generally harmless. However, there are a few facts you’ll want to be aware of.

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Glow Jewelry

Children love glow jewelry because of the bright colors and the magical way they light up. They come in all shapes and sizes and are filled with liquid that glows a variety of fluorescent colors. Kids tend to chew on their glow jewelry and bend them as they are playing with them. Parents and kids alike are surprised when they break open in their hands and mouth.

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Glue

Glues used for craft and school projects are often left sitting out open on the table, making them an easy reach for young children. Ingestion (or swallowing) of “school glue,” sometimes referred to as white glue or paper glue, is not expected to cause many symptoms. Glue is made up of water with a small amount of a chemical called polyvinyl acetate.

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Gummy Vitamins

The Missouri Poison Center handles calls every day about children getting into gummy vitamins. When we receive a gummy vitamin call, it is not unusual to hear about large numbers of vitamins that have been eaten.

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Hair Gel

Hair gels, like other cosmetic products, are often kept on bathroom countertops, making them easy for children to reach. Small children may be attracted to the way hair gel smells or simply want to imitate you by using the product.

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Hair Spray

Hairspray is used to protect the hair against humidity and hold a certain style. Hairsprays consist of polymers which act like a glue to coat the hair and help keep it in place.

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Hair Wax, Chalk, or Dye

There are a number of hair coloring options on the market, ranging from conventional hair dye to “child-friendly” chalk. These products can be temporary or permanent. Because coloring hair in vibrant reds, purples, and blues is a trend among teens and tweens, kids may want to give these products a try.

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Hand and Body Lotion

A child finding some lotion during an unsupervised moment is a common call to the poison center. Children are fast and find things we did not even know were left out. Children love to imitate adults and sometimes use lotions the right way by rubbing it onto the skin, but often they decide to do a taste test instead. Lotion is not toxic so the small amount that a child usually eats will not make your child sick.

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Hand Sanitizers

Hand sanitizers have a high percentage of alcohol as the active ingredient (usually ethyl or isopropyl alcohol, or a combination of both). The alcohol in the hand sanitizer can have the same effects as drinking an alcoholic beverage, but this is not likely in accidental taste ingestions.

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Hydrogen Peroxide

Hydrogen peroxide comes in different strengths and has many uses. Most calls to the poison center involve hydrogen peroxide 3% in the familiar brown bottle.

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Ice Melt

Ice melting products can be made of calcium chloride, potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, or a combination of these chemicals. There is also the more traditional ice melt, called rock salt, which is sodium chloride (the same as table salt).

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Insect Bites

Calls to the poison center regarding insect bites are a common occurrence and rarely result in harmful symptoms. Most often we are called about red bumps that vary in size and appearance. Our first concern is to avoid an infection. Any time there is a break in the skin, even the small puncture that an insect leaves, there is a chance for an infection to occur.

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Insects

Children eating an insect may be alarming to parents; however, some insects are eaten in other countries as a source of protein in their normal diet. Once the insect is in the stomach, it is digested just as any food would be.

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KY Jelly (Lubricants)

KY Jelly is a personal lubricant and is also used in medical settings as a surgical lubricant. It is water based and considered non-toxic.

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Liquid Starch

Liquid starch is a product that adds firmness to fabrics and helps make ironing easier. It’s also used as an ingredient in some “slime” products, which are designed for children to play with.

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Magic Eraser

The Magic Eraser is a melamine foam sponge (like a very fine sandpaper) which is able to clean items such as ceramic stove tops, dirty hubcaps, and can even remove crayon markings from walls. The ability of this sponge to clean messes where other cleaners have failed makes it appear to be “magic”.

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Markers and Ink

This information applies to markers which include highlighters, dry erase, washable, and permanent markers, and also includes inks found in ball point pens and gel pens. Common calls to the poison center regarding inks involve the school aged child chewing on a pen with reports of it “exploding” in the mouth or a young child chewing on a marker.

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Matches

Matches are made up of a stick with a flammable coating on the tip. The match stick is made of wood or cardboard and is not toxic, but can be a choking hazard for children.  The tip of the match is made of a flammable material which catches fire by striking it across a surface that provides friction. 

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Melatonin

Melatonin is a hormone produced by your brain’s pineal gland to help make you sleepy. In fact, it’s referred to as the sleep hormone, because it helps regulate your body’s daily wake-sleep pattern.

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Mold

What do you do if you discover that your child has eaten a bit of moldy bread left in the pantry? Is mold toxic?

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Mothballs

In addition to the traditional “ball” form, mothball products come in flakes, crystals, or bars. The mothball starts out in solid form but slowly changes into a toxic gas which can kill clothes moths and their eggs.

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Muscle Creams

Muscle rubs like Bengay® and Icy Hot® are used to soothe aches and pains in adults. However, they can be toxic if swallowed and should be kept out of reach of kids. 

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Nail Polish

This information applies to base coat, top coat and nail polishes which typically consist of a solvent, a plasticizer with cellulose, resins and dye. This information does not include nail polish removers or products used for artificial nails such as acrylic primer, powder and liquid, acrylic nail removers and fungicides.

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Nystatin

Nystatin is available in liquid, tablets, creams and suppositories to treat fungal infections. The liquid medication is frequently prescribed for thrush, a fungal infection of the mouth.

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Paint

Painting a room looks fun to a child with the brightly colored paint, oversized brushes and rollers, and ladders to climb on. They usually find the open paint bucket and dip their hand in, rub it all over, and put some in their mouth. Children also get into the art box of acrylic paint and squeeze it on their hands and into their mouth. In either case, the child usually realizes the paint doesn’t taste as good as it looks.

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Paper

It’s not uncommon for babies and toddlers to put everything in their mouths, including scraps of paper. Paper is primarily composed of cellulose, which is harmless. Newspaper print and other types of ink are non-toxic in small amounts as well.

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Pencils and Pencil “Lead”

Pencil “lead” is not actually lead, but is a soft mineral called graphite, bound together with clay and wax.  Don’t get it confused with real lead that might be found in paint chips from homes built before 1978, weights for fishing lines or curtains, decorated pottery, and other sources.

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Perfume

Perfumes and colognes are tempting to children. They not only smell good, they also come in ornate, beautiful bottles that children may be curious about. If parents use fragrances, children may want to mimic them or even try to taste the liquid.

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Pet Food

Pet food is very similar to human food because it uses the same ingredients such as chicken, meat, and vegetables, although not the best parts.  It is usually cooked, but not always. 

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Petroleum Jelly

Petroleum jelly is also known as petrolatum, white petrolatum along with the brand name Vaseline®. It is a semi-solid, thick ointment that is used as a skin protectant and lubricant.

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Plant Food

While good for plants, plant food products are not good for children and should be stored it in a safe place, away from children and pets.

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Play Dough

Play dough is a soft putty used by children as a modeling compound. Common store bought brands include Hasbro Play-Doh, Crayola Dough, and RoseArt Fun Dough. These products are certified as nontoxic because it contains no material in a large enough quantity to injure a human.

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Play Foam, Play Sand, Play Slime

Back in the day, kids had Play-Doh or Silly Putty. Now, they have a wide variety of moldable toys, including foam, sand, and slime. Luckily, these products are designed for kids and are typically non-toxic.

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Potting Soil

Potting soil is used to grow plants, vegetables and herbs in containers. Most commercially purchased potting soils have been sterilized in order to inhibit the growth of weeds and plant-borne disease.

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Probiotics, Prebiotics and Synbiotics

Beneficial bacteria naturally live in everyone’s gut.  Probiotics are similar living bacteria and yeasts that people take to restore the healthy balance of bacteria in their gut and keep it that way.  

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Protein Powder

The various protein powders on the market are popular among athletes and those taking steps toward a healthier lifestyle. Young children might be attracted to protein powder products, especially if they see their parents and older siblings using them, or their favorite sports stars advertising them on television.

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Raw Meat

We have to face facts that our fresh food supply has germs.  Thankfully, most of the time there is no problem at all.   Raw or undercooked meat can result in a type of food poisoning, but this rarely happens. 

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Shaving Cream

Shaving cream is a fluffy white cream used on the face or body when shaving the skin. The ingredients, which include soaps, surfactant, and propellant, are mildly toxic, but not serious if ingested in small amounts.

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Silica Gel

Silica gel comes in small paper packets that are included with many kinds of items bought at the store. For example, it is often found with shoes and purses, cameras and cell phones, in the pockets of coats and jackets, and in bottles of medicine such as vitamins. Silica gel sometimes looks like little clear, round beads, and sometimes like very small rock crystals. It is a “desiccant” which means it keeps things dry. It pulls water into itself so that mold and musty odors don’t get started and damage the items.

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Soap – Hand and Body

Soaps are generally of low toxicity. They do not taste good which limits the amount ingested. Small bites from bar soap or licks of a liquid soap will cause a bad taste in the mouth and possible upset stomach and vomiting or diarrhea.

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Spackle

Spackle is a white, soft moldable putty used to fill holes in walls or to fill in the gaps between sheets of drywall or wallboard before it is painted. 

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Spoiled Milk

Milk is a highly nutritious, but is a perishable food containing protein, fat and sugar. The milk sold today is pasteurized, meaning the milk is heated for a brief period of time to kill disease-causing bacteria; however, this process does not kill ALL bacteria.

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Styrofoam

Styrofoam is a foam plastic that does not break down or get absorbed into the body when ingested. If a large piece of styrofoam is ingested, it can cause gagging and choking. There is a chance for the piece to become stuck in the esophagus and cause mild discomfort with swallowing.

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Sunless Tanning Products

Sunless tanning products are used to get the appearance of a suntan on the skin without the use of the sun. These products come in a variety of forms including sprays, lotions, gels, mousses, and wipes that can be applied to the skin.

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Sunscreen

Sunscreens should be applied to all exposed areas of the body, including the lips (use a sunscreen specifically intended for use on lips). They are usually only ingested in small amounts since they do not taste good. If swallowed, they can be irritating to the stomach and can result in vomiting or diarrhea.

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Super Glue

Super glue is a type of glue called a cyanoacrylate, a fast-setting liquid that bonds two surfaces together very quickly. When exposed to moisture, the liquid monomers (single units) present in cyanoacrylates cross-link (bind together) within 5-60 seconds, and form a strong bond of multiple units (polymer) which are waterproof. In other words, if a monomer is one link on a chain, a polymer is the whole chain tightly linked together.

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Tanning Oil

Children are attracted to tanning oil because of its sweet, tropical smell. Like skin lotions, tanning oils are a mixture of oils, water, and other ingredients such as dyes and fragrances.

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Teething Rings

Plastic teething rings that are filled with liquid, may crack open or break with chewing, resulting in the liquid getting into the child’s mouth. The liquid typically consists of either salt water or glycerin and water. The vast majority of these teething ring exposures do not pose a poison danger. They might give the child a bad taste in their mouth, but there are no serious symptoms expected.

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Teflon

Teflon® is a well-known brand name for Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and is used as a non-stick coating for cookware and ovens. It is also used in the medical setting as a coating on catheters which helps prevent infection by stopping germs from sticking to the surface of the catheter.

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Thermometers

Thermometers are important to have in the house to check body temperature in an illness but sometimes they break open, spilling out the liquid inside. The information for clean-up and treatment varies based on the type of thermometer. Regardless of the type of liquid inside, broken glass thermometers always have a risk for injury from the sharp pieces of glass, so use caution during clean-up.

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Toilet Bowl Deodorizer

Toilet bowl deodorizers are available as a clip-on to the side of the toilet bowl, or as a gel disc that clings to the toilet bowl. The product cleans and deodorizes the toilet bowl with every flush.

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Toothpaste

Children getting into toothpaste is a very common call to the poison center because they love to imitate adults. During an unsupervised moment with a tube of toothpaste, their curious nature may take over and the child may actually eat the toothpaste.

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Topical Steroids

Topical steroids, such as Hydrocortisone Cream, are used to treat skin irritation or rashes caused by inflammation. These topical steroid creams or ointments often contain ingredients like betamethasone, hydrocortisone, and triamcinolone.

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Tums

Tums is an over-the-counter antacid that contains calcium carbonate. It is sold as a chewable tablet, gummy, or soft chew. There are many different brand name and generic forms. The active ingredient, calcium carbonate, is used to treat acid reflux, heartburn, and indigestion by neutralizing stomach acid.

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VapoRub

Parents and grandparents have relied on products like Vicks VapoRubⓇ for decades. Also called chest rub or vaporizing rub, these products typically contain a combination of camphor, menthol, and eucalyptus oil.

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Vinegar

Vinegar is found in many different condiments to add flavor and zest to foods. With information found on the internet, vinegar has become a favorite of the Do-It-Yourself crowd to make natural household cleaners, remove water stains on wood furniture, and clean fruits and vegetables before eating, just to name a few.

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Vitamin C

Vitamin C is found naturally in foods such as citrus fruit, tomatoes, and leafy vegetables. As a supplement it comes in several forms, including tablets, gummies, powders, and hard lozenges.

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Wart Remover

Most of the over-the-counter wart removers have salicylic acid as the active ingredient. This medication is available without a prescription and works by peeling the hardened skin away in layers and promotes the body’s natural immune system to respond to the virus.

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Watercolors

Watercolors are a fun activity for kids to practice their fine motor skills however, children often become curious about the colored water that is made as they dip the paint brush. Thinking it might taste good, kids may put the brush in their mouth or drink the water used to clean off the brush.

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Window Gel Clings

Gel cling products come in several colors and shapes. Many people use them for decorating windows during the holidays to make their home feel more festive. While they’re only minimally toxic when actually swallowed, they can be a choking hazard.

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Witch Hazel

Witch hazel is a plant that has been used for centuries to make medicine. Today, you’re likely to find witch hazel in a drugstore, where it is sold as an astringent for the skin.

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Wite-Out

Wite-out, is just one popular brand name for correction fluid, is a white liquid applied to paper to cover errors. Most brands of correction fluid are composed of a mixture of water, titanium dioxide, latex, soap, resins and preservatives, however, some due contain other chemicals.

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